Tony Lucca

MOKB Sun King Concert Series

Tony Lucca

Anna Rose

Wed, July 9, 2014

Doors: 7:00 pm / Show: 8:00 pm

The HI-FI

$12.00

Tickets Available at the Door

This event is 21 and over

Tickets available at The HI-FI at 7PM!

Tony Lucca
Tony Lucca
He was cast by Justin Timberlake to play "the cool guy" in Timberlake's directorial debut.

He finished third on The Voice in 2012, won a record deal in the process, and received more press coverage than any contestant on the show that season... or any season, for that matter.

He made a record with Adam Levine, then toured with Maroon 5 and Kelly Clarkson.

He was cast on the hit show "Parenthood" playing himself as a rock singer, and performed an original song.

He even starred in an Aaron Spelling prime-time drama and dated Keri Russell for years, winding up in countless gossip mags.

His name is Tony Lucca.

So why isn't he a household name? Maybe he simply hadn't made the right record before.

This time, Lucca believes he has. It's his 8th full-length studio album, his first self-titled release, and first entirely self-produced effort.

"We went in with the intention of making a record that was as live-sounding as possible. I wanted to close my eyes and be able to visualize the players in the room or up on the stage, actually playing the songs together. One guitar over here, the other guy over there, bass, drums, some keys? I mean, that's the rock-n-roll I fell in love with when I was a kid." Lucca pulls inspiration from the heroes he heard on the radio growing up, from Tom Petty, Billy Squier to AC/DC's Angus Young, tapping into a sense of timelessness he places somewhere between The Black Crowes and the Black Keys.

Each of the 12 songs on "Tony Lucca" are deeply personal. The record kicks off with "Old Girl," Lucca's rebuff to the music business treadmill. On the upbeat "Imagination", Lucca recalls the evening where he met his wife... to the best of his ability. Lucca's fans will enjoy the diverse sonic quality of four of his trademark ballads -- the epic and sweeping piano-driven "North Star", the optimistic "Smoke 'Em", the push and pull of love lost and found in "Right On Time", and the sweet album closer that bares his daughter's name, "Sparrow."

Funded by a very successful Kickstarter campaign (one that hit its $25K funding goal just inside of 30 hours), Lucca feels strongly that his fans stepped up so that he could make the best record he possibly could -- one he could finally feel comfortable releasing with his own name as the title. To that point, Lucca says "this record is pure. And honest. And hopefully completely refreshing to its listeners."

Tony Lucca was born on the outskirts of Detroit on the heels of Motown's heyday, raised within the loving confines of an enormous family of musicians; his mom was the 10th of 12 kids who all sang and played. At the ripe old age of 12, Tony had his first paying gig as a musician at a Jr. High School dance and by the age of 15, he parlayed his childhood rock-n-roll fantasy into a legitimate career, getting cast among an extraordinary group of newcomers on The All New Mickey Mouse Club, along with Justin Timberlake, Ryan Gosling and Britney Spears.

Shortly after graduating high school, Lucca wound up in LA and embarked upon an independent recording career that would span over 20 years. Along the way he's toured with artists as colossal as Maroon 5, Kelly Clarkson, *NSYNC and Marc Anthony, as well as several of his fellow Hotel Cafe kin including Josh Kelley, Sara Bareilles, Joey Ryan (Milk Carton Kids), Gabe Dixon and Andrew Belle. Lucca won the LA Music Award for best male singer/songwriter in 2001 and appeared numerous times on Last Call with Carson Daly, as well as The Wayne Brady Show and The Tonight Show with Jay Leno. Also in 2013, Lucca was the sole entertainment for FOX's NFL Thanksgiving Day telecast for the Detroit Lions vs. Green Bay Packers game.
Anna Rose
Anna Rose
If New York-based rocker Anna Rose could add a subtitle to her name, she says it would be, "Don't Let the Name Fool You." She couldn't be more right. With that sweet name, the angelic blonde hair, the petite frame and unassuming smile, one might think she's just another pretty face with a pretty voice who likes to sing pretty songs.

But that couldn't be further from the truth. Anna Rose is a spitfire of rock and roll passion, a true guitar head who doesn't mind getting her fingers bloody, and a mix of Jim Morrison's sexy bravado with Brigitte Bardot's seductive stare onstage. It's the dichotomy of masculine and feminine, retro and modern, strong and vulnerable that makes her sophomore effort, Behold a Pale Horse, a true statement of who she is as a woman, a performer, and an artist.
"My name is very sugary, but my personality is very spicy. My mom used to call me a little ball of fire. I love hard. I hate hard. I play hard, but if you calm me down, I can be gentle. That's what this album is. It shows the true essence of who I really am as a person, as an artist," says the East Village New York-based 27-year-old singer/songwriter/guitarist.

And who that is exactly is a little bit of rock and roll, a little bit of blues, and a whole lot of a songwriter who is finally coming into her own and finding her true voice. "My first record, Nomad, was more of a collection of songs from a young songwriter. It was a songwriter showcase album. But on Behold a Pale Horse you really see the kind of artist I am and want to be. It's more of an artist's album," she says.

img-anna-bio-2-tmp Her new material is coming from a stronger, deeper, and even darker place. The CD title, and title track, Behold a Pale Horse is a phrase from the Book of Revelations, and is a representation of death. " The album is about the concept of death and what that really means to each of us individually based on our histories. For me, death is not just physically dying. It can be the death of a relationship or a friendship, the ending of an era in your life, anything like that. Death is everywhere, but so is rebirth and it's that cycle that spawned this record," says Anna Rose. "This album might have come from a darker place, but ultimately I think helped create this stronger more empowered me. I finally feel like I know where I belong now and I know who I am more than ever before."

Her talented family is a big part of who she is. Her father is Oscar-winning Disney composer Alan Menken and her mother, Janis, was a dedicated and celebrated dancer who donned ballet shoes until she was 8 ½ months pregnant. Not only did Anna Rose inherit her parents' musical and dancing talent – having danced as soon as she could walk, sing as soon as she could talk, and learned piano at 2 and guitar at 5 – but she was instilled with a strong work ethic as well. And though she grew up in the house that Disney built – and even sang on demos for dad's score to Enchanted and Tangled – Anna Rose's musical soul leans more toward gritty, blues-drenched rock and roll from the '60s and '70s.

"As much as my dad's known for Disney musicals, at home it was very much more rock and roll – Little Feat, the Rolling Stones, the Beatles," she says. "And, I'm drawn toward strong females – especially as inspirations for this album – such as Stevie Nicks, Janis Joplin (her dog is named Joplin), Chrissie Hynde, and Joan Jett. But there are also influences of the Stooges, Tom Waits, Nick Cave, and even back to Son House, Muddy Waters, and Buddy Guy. Yes, I'm an old soul." (She even got to fill Iggy Pop's shoes at a benefit for the late Ron Asheton at the Roxy in L.A. in 2010.)

Anna Rose taps into those influences beautifully on the Kevin Salem-produced Behold a Pale Horse, in which she wrote or co-wrote all of the 11 songs. "I used to write in a vacuum, just by myself. I felt like I had to do it alone," she admits. "But Kevin really opened me up to writing with others for the first time and to opening myself up musically. He also helped me be comfortable in bringing out the rock more on this record – and this record is definitely a lot harder. I really feel like I've grown because of it."

Moving back to New York after a five-year stint in Los Angeles also weighs in on this record musically and lyrically, especially on the songs "Los Angeles" and "Beautiful World." "Los Angeles' is all about this city that I idolized for its '60s/'70s Laurel Canyon music scene, which influenced Nomad. On that record, I was searching for something. I was restless," explains Anna Rose, who wrote more on electric guitar than acoustic this time around to achieve that more rocking sound. "And 'Beautiful World' is about returning to New York and realizing this is where my home is, this is where that restlessness quiets. This is where my search stops."

Though the idea of death in general, provided a focus for the album, the title track, "Behold a Pale Horse," is actually more about one's legacy. "I think all that matters is what you leave behind. I want to leave behind really great music that's not just a hooky song for radio or something people can shake their ass to. I want to make music today that will allow me to keep making music tomorrow. Music that is real and authentic," she says.

On Behold a Pale Horse, Anna Rose is certainly off to a great start on creating that musical legacy.
Venue Information:
The HI-FI
1043 Virginia Ave #4
Indianapolis, IN, 46203
http://www.hifiindy.com/