Kopecky

MOKB Sun King Concert Series

Kopecky

James Wallace & the Naked Light

Fri, June 27, 2014

Doors: 8:00 pm / Show: 9:00 pm

Radio Radio

$12.00

Tickets Available at the Door

This event is 21 and over

Kopecky
Kopecky
The second album from six-piece Kopecky, Drug for the Modern Age takes the many shake-ups the band’s endured over the past few years and turns them into inspiration for groove-driven, melody-heavy alt-pop that’s intensely emotional and strangely exhilarating. “The album was written in this weird time of so much pain but also happiness, and that really informed the writing and recording,” says vocalist/guitarist Gabe Simon, who co-founded the group with vocalist/keyboardist Kelsey Kopecky in 2007. “Our goal was to talk about all these very serious things we were dealing with, but in a way that felt nothing like wallowing and more like standing triumphantly, or even dancing our way through it.”
In achieving that dynamic, Nashville-based Kopecky (whose lineup also includes guitarist Steven Holmes, bassist Corey Oxendine, cellist Markus Midkiff, and drummer David Krohn) offer moments of symphonic grandeur alongside edgy, electronic-leaning innovation. Meanwhile, their daringly intimate lyrics both unsettle and engage, asking questions and encouraging reflection on the part of the listener. “The idea behind the title Drug for the Modern Age is that we’re all trying to find the drug that helps us get through life and deal with the pressures and challenges that almost everyone in our generation faces,” says Gabe. “Whether it’s love or real connection or even an actual drug, we’re all looking for something that makes us feel like we’re a part of something good and meaningful.”
Formerly known as the Kopecky Family Band, their 2012 debut Kids Raising Kids, had them teaming up with producer/engineer Konrad Snyder. This time around they worked with Konrad again, but took a more slowed-down and deliberate approach that allowed them to bring a new level of sophistication and soulfulness to their songcraft. When it came time to record, the band divided up their sessions between several different locations, including EastSide Manor Studios (an East Nashville facility complete with an old indoor pool converted into a reverb chamber).
Drug for the Modern Age serves up its share of intricately layered love songs, revealing Kopecky’s endless grace in merging sweetness and melancholy. Throughout the album, they also consider the more shadowy dimensions of the human heart. “One of the main things we wanted to address on this album is the fact that, in a time when we’re all so wired in and constantly staring at our phones, we’re not engaging and hearing each other’s stories the way we should be,” says Gabe. Not only essential in helping certain band members cope with major life changes, that telling and hearing of stories went a long way in elevating the band’s songwriting. “We made a point of taking a step back and being real with each other and opening up, rather than just trying to hash our way through songs,” says Gabe. “It really helped us to voice our feelings in our lyrics in a more candid way than we ever had before.”
With the band forever bound by their shared passion for purposeful songwriting, all that revelation and sometimes-painful truth-telling ultimately fulfills something central to Kopecky’s mission: a deeper and stronger connection with each person listening.
James Wallace & the Naked Light
James Wallace & the Naked Light
It was once said that James Wallace would be the kind of guy you'd want on your side if you ever got into a music fight in prison. He'd probably tell you that too, just to clarify his position on not getting into a real fight in prison. That said, his penchant for dark and clever wordplay above eerily-cheery melodies, begs there may be a few twisted stories from his past that we've yet to hear.
Similar to what has often been said of Belle and Sebastian's earlier works, More Strange News From Another Star captures a distinct vintage quality channeled from some non-existent folk music period of decades past. Often referenced to Paul Simon in vocal range and use of textured percussion, Wallace's writing showcases a similar love of African music and Gospel harmonies. But more often than not, his band heads into the more ramshackle, go-for-broke qualities of the early Kinks. A kind of Rock and Roll bred with cacaphony that balances eerily well beneath Wallace's falsetto.
As for the influences in his stories, that is quite the rabbit hole to explore. Whether they be citied from one of his many wandering trips to China, his short residency as a piano player for a small Black Mennonite Church in Appalachia, or an oft mentioned tale about a mysterious box of letters found in an abandoned storehouse concerning aliens and the end of the world, Wallace seems to have a lot to draw on, and that well dosen't seem to be running dry anytime soon.
Venue Information:
Radio Radio
1119 E. Prospect St.
Indianapolis, IN, 46203
http://www.futureshock.net/