Tristan Prettyman

92.3 WTTS & MOKB Present: Sun King Concert Series

Tristan Prettyman

Caitlin Rose, Andrew Combs

Wed, April 10, 2013

Doors: 7:00 pm / Show: 8:00 pm

Radio Radio

$17.00

Tickets Available at the Door

This event is 21 and over

Tickets available at Radio Radio at 7:00PM!

Tristan Prettyman
Tristan Prettyman
With her first three recordings, 2003's The Love EP, 2005's breezy twentythree and 2008's Hello, Tristan Prettyman parlayed her smoky alto voice and laid-back surfer-girl-from-San-Diego charm into an eight-year career studded with highlights that included Hello's No. 2 position on the iTunes Digital Albums chart and headlining tours across the U.S., Europe, and Japan.

But instead of capitalizing on the attention and immediately making plans to record a third album after wrapping two years of touring in support of Hello, Prettyman took an extended break during which she traveled the globe, had surgery to remove polyps on her vocal cords, got engaged to her long-term boyfriend, dealt with the pain of his ending the engagement, and eventually questioned whether she even wanted to be a musician at all.

"I was really burnt out and uninspired, so I decided to take some time off," Prettyman says. "I went to Bali, Australia, and Europe and kind of went crazy. Life went from all these obligations to eating good food, meeting amazing people, and flowing with the wind. Then when I got back and tried to sing again, we found the polyps, so I had surgery and had to recover. Through it all, I was one foot in and one foot out of whether I wanted to do music at all. I had periods of time where I was numb and immune to feeling. My walls were up really high and I was on my guard. Then this fairy-tale picture of what my life could have been was set on fire. That brought all my walls down; it was a relief to finally feel something again."

Prettyman chronicles the experience on her new album, the raw, emotionally charged Cedar + Gold, which finds her sifting through the wreckage of her relationship and emerging stronger on the other side. "I started writing songs from a place that was so deep and honest, where I didn't hold anything back," she says. "It felt so good. I was like, 'This is what music is about — being able to release what is trapped inside of you.' Whenever anything ached or caused me pain, I'd tell myself, 'Save it for the record.'"

With an artistry that lies in her finely etched lyrical details and intimate vocal performances, Prettyman spares no one, including herself, on songs like "Say Anything," "I Was Gonna Marry You," "Come Clean," "Glass Jar," and "Never Say Never," which ends a heartbreaking spoken-word outro: "You can't start a fire in the pouring rain."

Prettyman wrote several of the songs with Dave Hodges, whom she first met the morning after a particularly emotional night. "I go meet Dave and I'm late and I'm crying," she says. "I'm just a ball of snot, like, 'Hi, I'm Tristan and I'm a mess.'" That session yielded the completion of the album's opening track "Say Anything" — an open-hearted tune about finding freedom in letting go. The second session resulted in the no-holds-barred "I Was Gonna Marry You." "It was like, 'Wow, I'm getting really transparent here and being really specific,'" Prettyman recalls. "But once I walked through the door of honesty there was no telling where I was going. I'd never spoken out before about the way it really was, but I found myself saying 'Screw it, I'm going to tell the whole story.'"

As intense as some of the songs may be, the mood is tempered not only by playful, lighthearted tunes like first single "My Oh My" ("about someone still having their hand on you and you playing that game with them because it's fun, even though you know it's not good for you and it's going to backfire"), "The Rebound," "Quit You," and the sexy, smoldering "Bad Drug," but also by the album's warm, earthy sound, which Prettyman created with her producer Greg Wells (Adele, Katy Perry), who plays piano, bass, drums, and some guitar on the album. "Greg told me he was not going to hold my hand through this; I had to convince him I wanted it," she says. "He forced me to step into really being a musician and owning what I do. Once I did that, I got super creative and the songs started coming from a different place. It was a very intuitive process."

When mixing on Cedar + Gold wrapped, Prettyman went back to her hotel room and burst into tears. "I couldn't believe it was done," she says. "I got everything out. It no longer lived in me. It felt like a weight had been lifted off my shoulders. I finally felt free."

Cedar + Gold (whose title refers to both the cedar walls and ceilings in the home where she recovered from her heartbreak and the gold she spun from her situation in the songs) is an album that manages to be both deeply personal, but highly relatable to anyone who's had the ground collapse under them and fought their way back to healing. "It's actually a very hopeful album in a lot of ways, which I think is a common theme in all my records," she says. "The idea that 'things may be a bit crappy right now, but let's make the most of it' is very reflective of me as a person and my outlook on life. I always try to look at the bigger picture of why something is happening. And I love that I was able to go so deep and dig around in places I never thought I could access and still remain hopeful at the end of the day."
Caitlin Rose
Caitlin Rose
Exploring your emotions can make for a good song, but it’s shining light on those which plague us
all that builds the backbone of the truly great ones. Coupled with tireless melodies that seep into the small
spaces between your bones; it's the kind of music that brings on little movements when life has gotten too stiff.
This is what Caitlin Rose does best. Her lyrics – visceral, illustrative, witty and wry – are pieces of stories that
examine matters of the heart through a unique lens that makes us all see a bit more clearly: from the loneliness
of relationships, to palpable dissolving human connectivity, to the loss of love with none of the melodrama. At
her core, Nashville’s Rose is a storyteller and a song-crafter who is more interested in what's being produced
than how it helps her along the way.

Though much of her acclaimed debut Own Side Now was personally-inspired, what stood out most was
its ability to paint a picture and tell a near-cinematic story, from the simultaneous last puffs of both cigarette
and relationship, to the delightfully seedy characters pocketed in a coin-toss on the streets of New York City.
With her follow-up, The Stand-In, Rose seems more interested in telling tales than spilling confessionals. "It
feels more compelling to live through a song than it did having already lived it,” she says, The Stand-In is a
journey down a road she’s always wanted to take: the path of the story-song. One track, “Pink Champagne,”
inspired by a Joan Didion short essay, accounts for the desperate, short-lived passions of a Vegas wedding.
The emotions stem from both protagonists, but are dissected and recounted by the watchful eye of the chapel
or some honest observer from within. This collection of songs seems bent on investigating relationships from
different perspectives; male and female, young and old, left and leaving, but they all tackle the bitter farewells,
romantic misunderstandings and endless responsibilities in life. Using fibers of her fringe country roots and the
bold musical capabilities of fellow producers/co-writers, Jordan Lehning and Skylar Wilson (Justin Townes
Earle), The Stand-In seamlessly melds pedal steel guitar with restless pop beats, creating lush instrumentals
that build on the more spare construction of Own Side Now. "These songs are all based in sentiment. We wrote
the stories to convey a feeling.” The result is infinitely more universal.

Rose doesn’t like to categorize her music, but like the great songwriters of our time, what she creates
is beyond easy classification. While she often mentions core influences like Linda Ronstadt, Bob Dylan and
Patsy Cline, she’s constantly absorbing books, movies, cultural ticks: when explaining her writing style, she
pulls a quote from famed 1930's daredevil, Karl Wallenda who said, "being on the wire is life; the rest is just
waiting.” The quote is referenced in Bob Fosse's 1979 semi-autobiographical film, All That Jazz. The film
was written and directed by the famed choreographer turned director whose colorful personality and editorial
brilliance became a lead inspiration in the making of The Stand-In. In the context of the scene in which it's
used, the quote comes off as a bit of a put-on, but somehow rings true for 'slave to show-biz' character Joe
Gideon; and Rose as well for whom, all paths lead to the song. Much like Fosse, she tends to describe her
work as restrained and deliberate, something evident on Own Side Now. Though for The Stand-In, she's taken
a few leaps outside her comfort zone, making the result, as she puts it, something like a "first attempt at a high
kick.”

It’s fitting that Rose wrote her first song at sixteen as a substitution for a high school paper. Even as a
means to an end, she recognized the power of music, and of melody, to relay emotions and stories in the most
gripping way possible. A youthful observer, she enjoyed hanging out after school at the local Waffle House
drinking cups of coffee and quietly shaping bits of gossip into first person tales of woe.

Growing up in Nashville to music industry parents (her mother, Liz Rose, is a songwriter who found
success working with artists like Taylor Swift, Leann Womack and others), Rose inherited her mother's
“inclination towards melody –the ability to naturally know where melody could and should go” early on and
again credits her love of songwriting to a long list of influences, many of which would be easily found in either
of her parents record collections. From Hank Williams to The Rolling Stones, she says, "I've always been more
inspired by what others have done."

This is evident in her penchant for covers – two have made their way onto The Stand-In (“I Was
Cruel,” by The Deep Vibration and “Dallas” by The Felice Brothers). She considers herself not just a writer,
but an interpreter of song, eager to take works she admires and expose others to their brilliance and also

reinvent them in a way that upon listening you might catch something you missed before.

“For me the intention behind any song is writing a good one,” Rose says “and to create something
worthy enough to share with other people” Rose’s songs, however, are way beyond worthy. They’re downright
necessary.
Andrew Combs
Andrew Combs
Andrew Combs is a Texas songwriter, guitarist, and singer who lives in Nashville. His brand of country-folk looks back to Guy Clark and Mickey Newbury’s heyday in Nashville. Following the success of the self-released 2010 EP, Tennessee Time, Coin Records released the 7-inch “Big Bad Love” in April 2012. While the EP displayed a decidedly Nashville sound, “Big Bad Love” and b-side “Take It From Me” reveal a ballsier side—a folk-rock sound with nods to rough-and-tumble Chicago blues and Planet Waves-era Dylan. Combs’ live show was once described as a cross between the stripped-down country-rock of Merle Haggard and the tightly wound garage-punk of Detroit’s MC5. They call it country soul swag, and you should too.
Venue Information:
Radio Radio
1119 E. Prospect St.
Indianapolis, IN, 46203
http://www.futureshock.net/