FOUNTAIN SQUARE MUSIC FESTIVAL

Absorb. & MOKB Present

FOUNTAIN SQUARE MUSIC FESTIVAL

Phantogram, Dr. Dog, Bishop Briggs, Real Estate, COIN, The Cool Kids

Fri, October 6, 2017 - Sat, October 7, 2017

4:00 pm

Fountain Square, Indianapolis USA

This event is all ages

Over 50 artists on 5 stages!
Gates open at 4PM on Friday October 6
Gates open at NOON on Saturday October 7

 

Shows on THE NUCLEUS main stage and in Square Cat Vinyl are all ages.
Shows in HIFI, White Rabbit Cabaret, and Pioneer are 21+.

 

THIS EVENT IS RAIN OR SHINE

 

Questions? Visit our INFO page HERE.
Full list of artists HERE.

 

FOUNTAIN SQUARE MUSIC FESTIVAL
FOUNTAIN SQUARE MUSIC FESTIVAL
A new creative direction will bring an immersive music festival experience to Indianapolis’ historic Fountain Square neighborhood as the Fountain Square Music Festival (FSMF) returns Friday and Saturday, October 6-7, 2017. Produced by Absorb and MOKB Presents, FSMF builds on the city’s current festival landscape with a unique format allowing artists and audiences to converge.
Phantogram
Phantogram
Formed in 2007, Phantogram is an electronic rock duo consisting of Josh Carter (vocals, guitar) and Sarah Barthel (vocals, keyboards). The band has released three studio albums since its inception, including Eyelid Movies, Voices and Three, which features the popular song “You Don’t Get Me High Anymore.”
Dr. Dog
Dr. Dog
Dr. Dog’s third studio album on Anti, B Room, marks the band’s greatest point of clarity in more than a decade of performing and recording. Their arrangements, while still ambitious, are much simpler, moving past the multi-tracked pastiche of earlier efforts into a unique and vibrant band voice. Indeed, it is this discovery of the band-collective as a compositional tool that makes B Room the most cohesive, soulful, loose, and plain fun record of their career.

The making of B Room begins, not with the sound of guitars and drums, but with jackhammers. When Dr. Dog reconvened this winter to record, they didn’t have demos, they even didn’t have a place to make them. What they had was the foresight to know that the recording process needed to be remodeled. After ending their lease at Meth Beach, where they had been headquartered for the past eight years,the band took on the commitment of constructing an entirely new recording space within a now defunct silversmith mill. As bassist-vocalist Toby Leaman put it, “The whole process of recording really started with building the studio.”

Rather than just cosmetically altering the appearance to make it feel like their own as they’d done at Meth Beach, the band built out the new studio, from the studs to the sheet rock to the recording booth. As Leaman now understands, making a record is a lot like doing construction. Both require a similar amount of frustration, intensity, and cohesion. By building the space first and releasing all of that emotion, the band was then free to engage in their creative process without the expectation or preconception that they admittedly had brought into other sessions.

This lack of pretense was a welcome departure for guitarist-vocalist Scott McMicken. His affinity for creating ethereal soundscapes through multi-tracked instrumentals and effects was always rooted in the potential for a piece of music to feel greater than the sum of its parts. But as he came to accept, “I used to think that all I needed was a tape recorder and a bunch of instruments in a room. Now I realize that I’m useless by myself.”

Dr. Dog manifested McMicken’s epiphany by recording many of the album’s tracks as live takes. On songs like “Minding the Usher” and “Love” the spontaneity of the band’s live performances seamlessly fuses with the intricacy of their kaleidoscopic composition. Both Leaman and McMicken credit this evolution to relying less on the pre-produced demos they brought to other sessions, and more on the musicians surrounding them; an intention not so easily accomplished by two people who have been playing music together since 8th grade.

But with the melodic groundwork of bandmates Frank McElroy, Zach Miller, and Dimitri Manos, along with the intuitive rhythm of drummer Eric Slick, everyone was released from the self-conscious inhibition risked when songwriting is flowing from a single source. After being told by more than one listener that many beats on the album had a hip-hop quality, Leaman responded, “What I love about Slick’s drumming is that it doesn’t have to tell you that you should be moving to the music, you just do it, and that’s what I think he has in common with hip-hop or funk or soul.”

Leaman’s last thought touches on a current that travels throughout B Room. This album, in its purest form, is a soul album. It may be obvious as the first track opens with the Gamble and Huff inspired, “The Truth.” But as the album progresses, the music continues to take on a soulfulness that is vibrant in its simplicity. AsMcMicken put it, “The hallmark of soul music for me is that the arrangements are simple rather than virtuosic, and that the sound creates a feeling that is intuitive rather than intellectual.”

McMicken is proved true in the foot stomping revelry of “Nellie,” while the intuitive approach peaks in the almost spiritual “Too Weak to Ramble” where McMicken and Leaman strip everything down to just two guitars and Leaman’s fervent and tender vocals.

Although “The Sound of Philadelphia” influence may fade after the first track, the city that has helped define Dr. Dog’s sound remains a heavy presence on the album. When asked about the city’s role in their music, Leaman pointed out that many of the famous acts coming out of Philly were collaborations, from Eddie Lang and Joe Venuti to Hall and Oates. In his words, “Just a bunch of weirdoes playing music and taking risks together.” Assuming that Leaman is referring to Dr. Dog’s own journey with his deprecating analysis, he reveals a maturity and genuine self-awareness that is the essence of not just the album, but the band’s current place in time. From the construction of the studio to the recording of the album that took place within its walls, the band has found that boundless moment of creativity where their spirit and soul coexist.
Bishop Briggs
Bishop Briggs
BRIGGS WAS BORN IN LONDON TO SCOTTISH PARENTS FROM BISHOPBRIGGS, SCOTLAND, WHICH INSPIRED HER PROFESSIONAL NAME. AT AGE FOUR, SHE MOVED TO TOKYO WITH HER PARENTS. SHE SANG IN PUBLIC FOR THE FIRST TIME AT A TOKYO KARAOKE BAR, AND IMMEDIATELY REALIZED SHE WANTED TO CONTINUE PERFORMING THROUGHOUT HER LIFE. GROWING UP WITH THE CITY'S KARAOKE BAR TRADITIONS AND HEARING MUSIC FROM MOTOWN MUSICIANS TO THE BEATLES AT HOME ALSO INFLUENCED HER TO PURSUE MUSIC. SHE STARTED WRITING HER OWN SONGS AT AGE SEVEN, WHICH SHE WOULD PERFORM FOR HER FAMILY. SHE MOVED TO HONG KONG AT AGE 10, WHERE SHE LIVED UNTIL SHE WAS 18. AFTER GRADUATING FROM HONG KONG INTERNATIONAL SCHOOL SHE MOVED TO LOS ANGELES, CALIFORNIA.

AFTER MOVING TO LOS ANGELES, BRIGGS STARTED HER CAREER BY PLAYING IN ANY VENUE SHE COULD, OFTEN FOR CROWDS AS SMALL AS THREE PEOPLE. SHORTLY AFTER A 2015 PERFORMANCE IN A LOCAL BAR THAT GAINED THE ATTENTION OF FORMER A&R REPRESENTATIVE GEORGE ROBERTSON, BRIGGS RECORDED HER FIRST SINGLE "WILD HORSES" UNDER THE NAME BISHOP. THE SONG WAS PRODUCED BY MARK JACKSON AND IAN BRENDON SCOTT. MANY USERS FOUND BRIGGS VIA SHAZAM WHEN SEEING AN ACURA COMMERCIAL WHICH FEATURES THE SONG.

IN JANUARY 2016, BRIGGS RELEASED THE SINGLE "RIVER" AND CHANGED HER RECORDING NAME TO BISHOP BRIGGS TO AVOID CONFUSION WITH A HEAVY METAL BAND OF THE SAME NAME. THE SONG WAS A COMMERCIAL SUCCESS. SHORTLY AFTER ITS RELEASE, THE SONG QUICKLY MADE IT TO NUMBER 1 ON HYPE MACHINE'S POPULAR CHARTS AND REACHED NUMBER 2 ON SPOTIFY'S GLOBAL VIRAL 50. IT ALSO RECEIVED AN HONORABLE MENTION ON SHAZAM'S PREDICTED SONGS OF THE SUMMER 2016, WHICH WAS FEATURED IN BILLBOARD. AS OF MAY 2016, "RIVER" WAS STEADILY CLIMBING THE SHAZAM FUTURE HITS CHARTS. "RIVER" HAS SO FAR PEAKED IN THE TOP 10 ON THE ROCK AIRPLAY AND THE ALTERNATIVE SONGS CHART.

IN MAY 2016, SHE RELEASED HER THIRD SINGLE, "THE WAY I DO". IT WAS ALSO ANNOUNCED THAT SHE WOULD OPEN FOR COLDPLAY IN THE FALL OF 2016 ON NINE OF THEIR TOUR DATES. BRIGGS MADE HER TELEVISION DEBUT ON AUGUST 1, 2016, PERFORMING "RIVER" ON THE TONIGHT SHOW STARRING JIMMY FALLON. SHE RELEASED HER FOURTH SINGLE, "PRAY (EMPTY GUN)" ON AUGUST 12, 2016.
Real Estate
Real Estate
American indie rock band from Ridgewood, New Jersey founded in 2008 by Alex Bleeker, Martin Courtney, Matthew Mondanile and Etienne Pierre Duguay. Jackson Pollis replaced Duguay on drums and Jonah Maurer joined the band on keyboards and guitar in 2011.
COIN
COIN
Excitement has been brewing for Nashville-based band COIN—Chase Lawrence (vocals/keys), Joe Memmel (guitar/vocals), Ryan Winnen (drums) and Zach Dyke (bass)— since their 2015 single, “Run.” Their debut self titled album, produced by Grammy winning producer Jay Joyce (Cage the Elephant, Sleeper Agent), was released in the summer of 2015 and established COIN as a band bred for widespread acceptance.

Chase and Joe first crossed paths at Nashville’s Belmont University, where they sat next to each other in a music theory class. Soon after the two decided to try writing music together, Ryan and Zach were introduced to them through mutual friends. The band then decided that they needed recorded music in order for promoters to book them to play live, so they recorded four songs at their school and released them for free on the internet. When they started playing local shows around Nashville, COIN quickly attracted a highly enthusiastic and loyal live following.

The group has since toured non-stop with acts such as Walk The Moon, Passion Pit, Young the Giant, Neon Trees and others, perfecting their sound and energetic live performance. Billboard hailed them as ‘new wave crash-course survivors,’ destined to ‘break the Nashville mold.’ SPIN, NYLON, and Stereogum praised them as up-and-comers to watch, as 2015’s “Run” became a heavy rotation pillar on Sirius XM radio’s Alt Nation, (the 5 th most spun song of the year for the popular radio platform). Snapchat included them in their ‘Best Of The Year’ artists’ list and The Atlantic cited them as one of their 21 bands to check out. The band has also played memorable slots at summer music festivals such as Lollapalooza, Shaky Knees, and Firefly that have created unrelenting anticipation for their sophomore album, which they are currently working diligently on in Nashville, Los Angeles, and New York in between tour dates.

In May 2016, COIN released a well-received (and quickly growing) preview of their second album with an infectious new single called “Talk Too Much,” which Chase has described as an impromptu change-of-pace from intensive touring: “The song came out easier than any song I've ever written. We had just come off of a two month tour and we wanted to slow it down to the likes of 80's new wave. It’s a song about my inability to leave things unsaid.” The track has struck a resounding chord with both pop and alternative fans alike due to its presence on a multitude of Spotify playlists, the continued support of Alt Nation and FM stations across the country.
The Cool Kids
The Cool Kids
After a hiatus that saw Chuck and Mikey each expand upon their individual musical and artistic pursuits, The Cool Kids are back with their new LP Special Edition Grand Master Deluxe. The album features the same barrier-breaking, revolutionary hip hop that cemented their status as legends in the first place along with a newschool high-gloss finish.
Venue Information:
Fountain Square, Indianapolis USA
Woodlawn & Virginia Ave
Indianapolis, IN, 46203