Gangstagrass

Sun King Brewery, The Magic Bus, MOKB Present

Gangstagrass

Ace One & Friends, Woody Pines

Sat, January 28, 2017

Doors: 8:00 pm / Show: 9:00 pm

The HI-FI

$12.00

This event is 21 and over

Gangstagrass
Gangstagrass
Best known as the Emmy-nominated makers to the hit FX drama Justified, Gangstagrass is now back with its fourth official album, the aptly-titled, American Music. Released in April 2015, American Music has done what no other Gangstagrass album has done before, charting on Billboard for the first time. Reaching Number 5 on the Bluegrass Charts, American Music debuted on the charts in only its first week of release. Featuring the radio staples, “Barnburning” and “Ran Dry,” American Music also celebrates the end of Justified with it’s remake of the Emmy-nominated “Long Hard Times To Come.”

“There are a lot more people out there with Jay-Z and Johnny Cash on their iPod playlists than you think.” says Rench, who had previously made a name for himself as an in-demand Brooklyn country and hip-hop producer and singer/songwriter. When he shared his first bluegrass/hip-hop experiment, Rench Presents: Gangstagrass for free on the internet, the buzz occurred instantly and unexpectedly. Suddenly, there was a buzz, championing Rench’s unique vision that combined hip-hop MCs with real bluegrass instrumentalists. As a consequence, Rench Presents: Gangstagrass received hundreds upon hundreds of thousands of downloads and Rench would wind up receiving an overflow of appreciation from fans who were enchanted by his Artistry.
When FX Network came to Rench looking for the Gangastagrass sound for the theme song to their new series Justified, he had bluegrass players lay down an original track with T.O.N.E-z, the an MC, and younger brother of early hip-hop legends Special K and T-LaRoc. The resulting track, “Long Hard Times To Come” blew FX away and when the show Justified became a hit with viewers, Rench and T.O.N.E-z received an Emmy nomination for “Outstanding Original Main Title Theme Music.”

Gangstagrass has since become a commercial and critical success. It’s music has been celebrated by The Washington Post, The Boston Globe, TV Guide, NPR and more than 50,000 fans who have frolicked to the band’s hundreds of shows and bought the band’s official LPs.
Ace One & Friends
Ace One & Friends
Woody Pines
Woody Pines
If you’re wondering where the music of Nashville troubadour WOODY PINES comes from, look to the streets. It was on the streets as a professional busker that Woody first cut his teeth, drawing liberally from the lost back alley anthems and scratchy old 78s of American roots music, whether country blues, jugband, hokum, or hillbilly. Heavy rollicking street performances are the key to some of today’s best roots bands, like Old Crow Medicine Show (Woody and OCMS’ Gill Landry used to tour the country in their own jugband), and they’re the key
to Woody’s intensely catchy rhythms, jumpy lyrics, and wildly delirious sense of fun. Woody traveled all over the streets of this country, road testing
his songs, drawing from the catchiest elements of the music he loved and adding in hopped-up vintage electrification to get that old country dancehall sound down right.
That’s why the songs on his new self-titled release WOODY PINES (released May 28 on underground label Muddy Roots Recordings) are so hot. This is gonzo folk music, the kind of raise-the-rafters, boot-shakin’ jump blues that used to be banging out of juke joints all over the South in the late 1940s, but now it’s burning into the earholes of a younger generation of Nashville kids, all looking for music with deep roots and something to hang on to.
It’s tempting to call Woody Pine’s newest music “rockabilly,” and in fact he recorded the new album at Sputnik Studios in Nashville, famous for recording rockabilly and psych-twang heroes JD McPherson, Jack White,
and Sturgill Simpson. But it might be more accurate to call Woody’s new songs “hillbilly boogie;” a rarely remembered genre of American music made famous by the Delmore Brothers. Hillbilly boogie sits at the exact moment when the buzzed- out, electrified hillbilly country music of Appalachia (which itself drew heavily from country blues), first hit the sawdust-floored honky-tonks of old Nashville and Memphis. It was the moment exactly before the birth of rock ‘n’ roll. Woody writes with
a wink to this critical time on songs like “Anything for Love” and “New Nashville Boogie,” drawing in modern references at will to make his points. He also dives deep into the tradition, drawing up gems like the old gangsta- folk song “Make It to the Woods”
from the Mississippi Sheiks. In Woody’s music, there’s never an idea that roots music should be a recreation of an older time. Instead, he taps the vein
of this music that’s still beating today, finding common ground with the old hucksters and bar-hounds who created the music in the first place.
When Woody Pines sings “when the train rolls by, I get a faceful of rain,” this isn’t some hipster dilettante twisting a faux-handlebar mustache and singing about old-timey railroads, this is a dedicated student of Woody Guthrie who used to hop freight trains to get from town to town. This is serious roots music that’s as much a way of life as an aesthetic choice. This music isn’t for dabblers; you gotta feel it in your bones. Let Woody Pines help.
Venue Information:
The HI-FI
1043 Virginia Ave #4
Indianapolis, IN, 46203
http://www.hifiindy.com/